Kayak – How To Use a Sculling Draw Stroke

    Published: 06-16-2009
    Views: 38,985
    Kayak instructor Mike Aronoff demonstrates a draw stroke called the sculling draw. This stroke works with the principle of lift; just like an airplane wing and it works by slicing the blade forward and back.

    Mike Aronoff

    Mike is an American Canoe Association highest level Instructor Trainer Educator in both Coastal and River Kayaking as well as WW Canoe. He is also a British canoe Union Coach with the 4 Star award in Sea Kayak. He is the Chairman of the Coastal Kayak Committee of the USA and on the ACA Safety Education and Instruction Committee. Mike has co authored a number of books on paddling and wrote the ACA Kayak Trip Leading Course. He is a guest instructor in many parts of the US for various programs. He is the owner/general manager of Canoe Kayak and Paddle Co. LLC, a northern Virginia based paddling school and outfitter with an Annapolis, MD branch. Mike is also a registered Idaho Guide and leads trips there and locally. He is most active in certifying ACA paddling instructors in sea and river kayaking.

    I am Mike Aranoff with Canoe Kayak and Paddle. Let us look at another type of draw stroke called the sculling draw. This stroke works with the principle of lift; just like an airplane wing and it works by slicing the blade forward and back. Be sure you have that out of the water and from the side, it's as if you were spreading peanut butter on the whole of the boat going forward, then you stop, then turn the angle of the blade and you spread peanut butter back. So it's a forward and back spreading motion. Then come back, this way scull forward, scull back, scull forward. Stroke might be frustrating to learn at first. Most people tend to put too much emphasis on opening the blade. You want to get used to just putting the blade back and forth through water with no pressure and then gradually opening up that means twisting the blade away from the kayak, as you go forward and turn around, twist it open up away from the kayak as you go back and that s what draws the kayak, a sculling draw.