Understanding an Internal Combustion Engine

    Published: 06-16-2009
    Views: 104,024
    Adam Kemp, the Energy Systems Lab Director at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology discusses how an Internal Combustion Engine works.

    Adam Kemp: Hi, I am Adam Kemp, the Energy Systems Lab Director at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology and today I am going to show you how an Internal Combustion Engine works. To start off I am going to give you a brief overview of both a two cycle and a four cycle internal combustion engine. We are going to go over the individual sub systems that make up the engine, including the electrical system, the fuel system, any of the mechanical systems behind it and an overall overview of the entire engine itself. Finally we are going to fuel, prime and then start an engine. For today's engine I am going to be using a six horse power Tecumsah Go-Kart engine. Some of the tools you are going to need in order to disassemble and then reassemble the engine include the following. We are going to need a slotted screwdriver, appropriate sized Phillips screwdrivers, appropriately sized socket drivers, ratchets and sockets, open ended wrenches and just in case you have a stuck nut or bolt, Pneumatic tools come in handy. I have a vinyl hammer in order to loosen any stuck components. We have vinyl, nitrile or latex gloves in order to keep our hands clean and a good stack of paper towels and then finally an Allen Wrench in order to remove the rockers later on in the video. Specialty tools such as our pneumatic impact wrench can be purchased at any local hardware store or tool outlet. Now in order to stay safe while you are working with an internal combustion engine, some of the materials and the fluids inside the engine can be hazardous. So please wear safety glasses while you are working, use gloves and work in a well ventilated area. Before you get started I will tell you a little bit about myself. I graduated from Virginia Tech with a Bachelors in Science in Technology Education in 2005 and immediately went to teach at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology teaching freshmen. I am now the Energy Systems Lab Director and get to play with engines and other mechanisms. Coming up next we are going to learn about two different types of internal combustion engines.