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Patrick Harders: Hi, my name is Patrick Harders with Outdoor Lighting Perspectives. Today, we are going to be speaking about outdoor lighting. Now, we'll go over outdoor lighting fixtures, selection and placement. The first fixture we are going to discuss is our well light. The well light is the work course of the outdoor lighting industry; this is used to light up the facade of the home, also we use it a lot on trees. It gives the best light source for a light side to side and top to bottom, very even light output. We recommend with this fixture, since it is buried in the ground, to always have a Pyrex glass lens cover. This will keep the debris off the fixture allowing the most light output to always occur.

In this particular house, it's a colonial style home with its beautiful brickwork, we are going to place this fixture about 8-10 inches off in front of the house, this obviously will be buried when we install it up to about this, just right below the wing that's here. As I am putting the light up, we want to have this perpendicular to the house shining exactly straight up and that gives the most even light output as we are lighting this. Now, it's important from my perspective of design is, I like to put the light on the brick and not underneath the windows. It's just gives it a much warmer appearance and that's really what we are trying to highlight, is the brick work of the house for this particular location. The other application we are going to use this well light for is up lighting in trees. We are lighting up the front of the tree and we are going to use two well lights, because it's got such a wide spans. So, we place these fixtures about 4 feet apart from each other and we are going to bury these into the ground on the installation. Now, one thing you notice with this fixture the backing is actually designed to block you from seeing the light source from the street.

This lens cover in the placement of the bulb also helps us to block the view from people walking on the sidewalk. Very important in your fixture selection and the location of the fixture is, always keep in mind light glare. We want to make sure that people do not see the light source, but really just focus on what's being lit up instead.

Our next fixture is our path light. Now, the path light is the most misuse and abused fixture in the lighting industry. We've all seen it, with someone as a runway of path lights where it looks likes they are trying to land airplanes. Proper design is less as more with path lights. What we look to get out of our path light is 5-10 foot circle of light; meaning that we could space our lights further apart.

In this entire walkway we are looking at 30-40 foot walkway. We are going to have 3 or 4 path lights. The idea is not to light up every square inch, but just to invite guests as they are coming in and out to be able to see the walkway. May times at the big box stores you see plastic fixtures, aluminum or painted fixtures that aren't designed to last.

This fixture here is a solid copper fixture, so when you put it in you are doing it once and you are done with your lighting project. Our next light is the floodlight. This fixture is a small fixture that's used to light up rock walls; we use it for lighting up shrubbery, casting shadows. In this application we want to put a linear light output on to this river rock bed here.

So, we are actually going to take the fixture, we are able to adjust this head, whether we wanted to shine up or down, we want this to shine down. So, we are going to tighten it down here, and give us a soft light going across this river rock bed. Our next fixture is the bullet light. This fixture puts a pin point light source on to the object we are looking for.

Today, we are going to use it to light up the peak of the house. It's also used for lighting up statues or we use this a lot in water features. Pull it off the water feature and hit right at the waterfall to really give a nice light source there. But today we are going to put this fixture right in the ground here shining up at the peak, and what that's going to do, is give a nice even light across the front of the house.