Home Theater Installation – Progressive and Interlaced

    Published: 06-16-2009
    Views: 16,886
    Home theater expert Keith Harmon discusses how to select the right screen for you home theater system, including progressive and interlaced options.

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    $\Hi, it is Keith Harmon with Smart Wired Home and we are back to talk about selecting the correct television screen for your home theater. So, when we start to look at screens we are immediately looking at high definition screens. Basically, I do not even want to inspect at this point in 2007; you are not considering any standard definition TVs. Most people will be looking at either a high definition, either a flat panel or perhaps a rear projection or a front projection screen. We will talk about some of the differences later, but first we are going to talk about the differences in resolutions. So, when we say standard definition TV, what does that mean? Well, we are talking about lines of resolutions. So, when we have the existing standard broadcast that all the stations are using, non high def broadcast, 330 lines of resolution we are talking about.

    Now, you move from that to a DVD and you jump from 330 lines to 480 lines. Now, you have got more resolution, more detail, you can usually tell a difference when you are playing a DVD versus watching a broadcast. That 480 lines of resolution is also the same resolution that you will get from a digital television broadcast, which is really only available from your cable company, you can also get that over the year to some extent although, if you are doing digital TV, they are pretty much broadcasting an HD TV. Now, when we look at high definition television that means 720 lines or up to a 1,080 lines of resolution, so we are really talking about a significant jump in the resolution from the old DVD and really from the old TV broadcast. Now, when you are looking at the resolution there is always a little letter after, you see an I or a P. You have probably hardly notice that which is interlaced or progressive. So, what does that mean? Well, first of all you have got the lines there, but how are those lines are refreshed? They are refreshed usually up to 60 times every second, so that is really fast, faster than your eye can recognize.

    So, that is why the pictures appear to be moving all the time because they are flashing so quickly. But when you look at the interlaced, that is we are first going to look at, every other line is refreshed each time you refresh the cycle. So, first one, then the other goes back and forth, so, that keeps the processor a little less taxed, so it is easier for the equipment manufactures to do interlace than it is progressive because they have to do twice amount or either half or twice amount of processing depending on which way you want to look at it.

    Then when we look at progressive, progressive is going to take all the lines and refresh them each time. So, you start to see this kind of refresh, so everything is just a little bit smoother because all the lines are being refreshed at the same time instead of alternating back and forth.

    Next, we are going to talk about the different kinds of technologies that are available, first one being the flat panel. A flat panel looking at both the LCD and the plasma and we are going to take a look at a plasma that is mounted on a wall, so it will give you an idea of how that would look. %*[]%(ab->Eefkx-SOopu'"+-7P")+24893/4h-_h{`hjIh.

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