How to Have Your Pet Spayed or Neutered

    Published: 06-16-2009
    Views: 18,314
    Dr. Gary Block, a board member of the Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association, breaks down how to have your pet spayed or neutered.

    Dr. Gary Block: Hi! My name is Dr. Gary Block, and I am a board member of the Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association.

    Today, I am discussing the importance of having your pets spayed or neutered.

    It's critically important for pet owners to be informed about spaying and neutering. Spaying or neutering your pet can help reduce the vast numbers of homeless cats and dogs who are euthanized or put down in animal shelters every year.

    In this video series, I will provide practical information for pet owners who are making the important decision to have their pet spayed or neutered.

    First, I will provide some basic information on what is involved with the medical procedure known as spay and neuter. It's a straightforward procedure that has minimal side effects on your pet. Then, I will discuss why you should have your pets spayed or neutered.

    Spaying and neutering helps prevent animal homelessness and saves life.

    Finally, I will talk about where you can have your pet spayed or neutered and provide tips on how you can prepare your pet the night before and what you can expect at the day of the procedure.

    Before we begin, let me tell you a little bit about myself and the Humane Society. I am a veterinarian who serves on the Board of Directors of the Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association, a national veterinary association focused on animal welfare. I am also co-owner of Ocean State Veterinary Specialists, a referral and emergency clinic in East Greenwich, Rhode Island.

    The Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association is an affiliate of the Humane Society of the United States, the nation's largest animal protection organization.

    Education about spaying and neutering is important for the Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association and veterinarians nationwide, because the number one cause of death for companion animals in the Untied States is euthanasia. Nearly, half of the approximately eight million cats and dogs who enter shelters each year are put down.

    I hope this video enhances your knowledge about spaying and neutering and helps you in the process of making this important decision for your pet.