Managing Family Care for Alzheimer’s Patients

    Published: 06-16-2009
    Views: 14,316
    Laurie Owen of Home Instead Senior Care provides tips for managing family care for Alzheimer’s patients.

    Laurie Owen: Hi I am Laurie Owen, from Home Instead Senior Care. Today I am talking about how families can care for their loved ones who have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or other Dementia. Dementia is a syndrome that can be caused by a number of progressive disorders and affect memory, thinking, behavior and the ability to perform every day tasks. There are many types of Dementia. The most common of which is Alzheimer's disease. Over time, Alzheimer's disease causes the brain to shrink dramatically affecting all of its functions and potentially causing changes and personality and relationships. While there are some medicines that can help slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease, there is no cure but there are a ways that you can help. By gathering stories and information from your loved ones past, you can help them make sense of the present. The Home Instead Senior Care network calls this approach capturing life's journey.

    By using the information, you can turn everyday activities into fun, social and positive experiences. For example, turn a bath into an activity to smell different soaps, or when helping your loved one get dressed, talk about fashion or their favorite colors. Doing so can help make them happier and less stressed. Alzheimer's disease can also lead to behavioral problems. There are four simple techniques you can use to defuse tough situations. First, give simple choices. Second, apologize or take the blame. Third, redirect their attention or fourth, remove your loved one from the environment. The last thing to remember when providing care is to make sure to take care of yourself, get plenty of rest, eat well, exercise and be sure to take breaks to relax and enjoy your favorite activities. By maintaining your health, you can create a better care giving experience for your loved one.

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