Preventing & Reporting Senior Scams

    Published: 06-16-2009
    Views: 8,800
    Mary Alexander from Home Instead Senior Care explains how to prevent and report some of the common senior scams.

    Mary Alexander: Hi! I am Mary Alexander from Home Instead Senior Care. Today I am talking about the steps to take to avoid senior scams and what to do if your senior loved one becomes a victim.

    According to the National Council on Aging, there are eight steps to take to prevent your senior loved one from being scammed.

    First, help your senior understand that he or she needs to be aware that they are at risk for scams by both strangers as well as those closest to them.

    Second, make sure your senior isn't isolated and stays involved with family, friends, religious organizations and favorite social activity groups.

    Third, ask your senior to tell solicitors that he or she wants everything in writing before responding to a telephone solicitation.

    Fourth, help your senior shred all documents that have credit card, social security and or financial account numbers on them.

    Fifth, help your seniors sign up for the do not call list at donotcall.

    gov. Sixth, ask your senior to sign up for direct deposit for benefit checks to prevent them from being stolen from the mail box.

    Seventh, make sure your senior never gives our credit card, banking, social security, Medicare or other personal information over the phone unless he or she initiated the call.

    Eighth, tell your senior loved one to be skeptical of all unsolicited offers and to take their time to be an informed consumer.

    If you discover your senior is a victim of fraud, there are several things you can do. Contact his or her local police department. Call the bank and or Credit Card Company. Cancel any stolen debit or credit cards.

    Contact the local chapter of the National Adult Protective Services Association. Notify the FBI through its Electronic Tips Program at tips.

    fbi.

    gov.

    To get more tips on protecting your senior loved one from fraud, visit protectseniorfromfraud.

    com.