Should I talk to my roommate before move in day?

    Published: 06-16-2009
    Views: 20,439
    Dr. Richard A. Stevens, Jr., Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Director of Residence Life at Shepherd University, discusses how to prepare for living with a roommate including contacting them before move in day.

    Richard Stevens

    Dr. Richard A. Stevens, Jr. currently serves as the Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Director of Residence Life at Shepherd University. He is also the Program Coordinator and Instructional Professor for the College Student Development and Administration there. He has worked in Student Affairs since 1987 with his first position as a Resident Assistant. Dr. Stevens received his Bachelor’s degree from the College of William and Mary, his Master’s degree from Iowa State and his doctorate from the University of Maryland, College Park. His research interests include identity development and college environments. Dr. Stevens has a strong commitment to the on-campus experience for students, both commuters and residential students. He has published articles on commuter students and their involvement in living learning programs as well as sexual orientation identity development and grounded theory methodology. He has served as the Editor of Developments, a national publication of the American College Personnel Association (ACPA) since 2002 and currently is the 2008 General Program Chair for their national Convention. Dr. Stevens is a member ACPA, the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, (NASPA), Phi Kappa Phi, and Mensa.

    Dr. Richard Stevens: Hi! I am Dr. Richard Stevens, Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs and Director of Residence Life at Shepherd University and today I am going to talk to you about preparing for roommate.

    Host: Should I talk to my roommate before move-in day?

    Dr. Richard Stevens: Absolutely you want to talk to your roommate before move-in day. Most campuses will mail your assignment with your roommate s name month or two before. Take that opportunity to talk with them about what it s going to be like to live together. Begin to discuss things that are pet peeves for you, things that you want to bring to campus. Phone is a great way to do it; email is wonderful but pickup the phone and really talk, and if you can meet that s even better.